Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Spring West Coast Tour 2014

My partner guitarist-composer Julian Mock and I will be on a multi-state book and music tour during the month of April. We will be performing/reading at small venues, salons, and house concerts in New Mexico, Colorado, Oregon, and California, sometimes separately and sometimes together. Please check Julian's blog for the latest schedule. 


Alyce Santoro is a conceptual and social/environmental practice artist, activist, and writer with a foundation in marine biology and scientific illustration. Best known as the inventor of sonic fabric, an audible textile woven from recorded audiocassette tape, Santoro refers to her multimedia works as philosoprops – devices used to demonstrate a concept or spark a dialog. Alarmed by what she sees as the direct relationship between the detached mindset cultivated in scientific research (and widely adopted by Western culture) and the destructive propensity of the technology that results from it, her works often offer subtle and deceivingly playful critiques of the foibles of dualistic thinking. Santoro's visual and sound pieces have appeared in over 50 exhibitions around the world related to smart textiles and fashion, innovative musical scores, and social action and ecology. A regular contributor to Truth-out.org and the author of Philosoprops: A Unified Field Guide, her written works often focus on the notion that by shifting some common assumptions about "the way things are" we can create a more just, healthy, and peaceful world. http://www.alycesantoro.com


Born into a musical family, Julian Mock is a perpetual student of the guitar as an instrument as well as the sounds it can produce. Having played in classical, jazz, and improvisational ensembles on both electric and acoustic instruments, designing listenable études for practicing difficult maneuvers led him, somewhat inadvertently, to create new compositions for solo guitar. Exploring old and new techniques, tonalities, and rhythms, and combining textures and ideas from different eras and places, Mock creates intricate, innovative, polyphonic mosaics of sonic possibilities. Sound Travels, Mock's 2002 album of solo compositions, was recorded on an acoustic steel stringed guitar. For the works on Ecstatic Mechanism, released in late 2013, he returned to his first instrument: the nylon stringed guitar. The compositions draw inspiration from Mock's diverse musical background, weaving together elements of dissonance and melody, tradition and experimentation, ranging from minimal to complex in rhythm and texture. http://www.julianmock.com





Friday, March 07, 2014

Liberty, Equality, Geography: An Interview with John P. Clark on the Revolutionary Eco-Anarchism of Elisée Reclus

I recently had the opportunity to interview communitarian anarchist philosopher John P. Clark on his new book containing critical analysis and new translations of the works of French geographer Elisee Reclus. The full interview is available at Truth-out.org.

"In reality, we have good reason to ask whether, if another world does not rapidly become possible, any world at all will remain actual. The impossible community, the Reclusian community of love and solidarity, is a practical and dialectical answer to this more than theoretical, more than rhetorical question. In the midst of a world-destroying epoch, the impossible community presents itself as a world-making and world-preserving community. In the midst of egocentric cynicism and moral paralysis, it is a charismatic community of gifts and of the gift. It is an ethos that inspires and reawakens the person, sweeping him or her into a new realm of deeper reality and more compelling truth. It is our ultimate hope for the world."

Friday, February 14, 2014

my grandfather, aka: the flying phantom, one of nyc's earliest bike messengers




My father (Nicholas John Santoro)'s father Nicholas Paul Santoro passed away today at the age of 99. He was born on November 7, 1914, the youngest of seven children and the only boy (an older brother did not survive past childhood). He and two sisters were born in New York City - his parents and four eldest siblings were born in Gravina in Puglia, Italy.

My grandfather's father lost a leg in an accident (he is wearing a prosthetic leg in the picture above), so, to earn a living, he and his wife embroidered tablecloths in their apartment in Manhattan. My grandfather dropped out of elementary school to dedicate himself to supplementing the family income, eventually earning a high school diploma by studying at night. He worked in Loft's Candy Factory in Long Island City (Queens) in the 1930's where he met my grandmother Anne Mamoliti, a fellow worker who was also from a family of Italian immigrants. They married once my grandfather secured a job with the US Post Office, where he worked first as a letter carrier, then latter as assistant postmaster, until he retired. During his early days as a mailman he was in charge of special deliveries on the Upper East Side. An avid cyclist, he realized he could deliver faster, and thereby earn a few extra cents, using his bike. So efficient was his technique, he earned the nickname "The Flying Phantom" from his fellow letter carriers, who took his lead and began making deliveries by bike.



In the 1950s my grandfather was able to get a transfer from the post office in Manhattan to one in Tenafly, NJ, a suburban setting well-suited for the raising of a family – they had two children, Mary and Nick. My grandmother, who had a beautiful singing voice and loved to cook using the best ingredients she could find, became a bank teller. She died from a stroke when i was 8 years old. 



My grandfather read the New York Times every day for 80-some years. On most days during many of those years, he worked on the crossword puzzle. In his late-80s he admitted that the early weekday puzzles were easier to complete - the Friday and Saturday puzzles were becoming more of a challenge. 

He also rode his bike avidly during his retirement, slowing down from 15 miles per day to 5 or 6 miles per day only once he reached his 80's. When he turned 90 and eye trouble prevented him from riding, he continued to walk, clocking himself diligently to make sure he was getting enough exercise. Only recently did my grandfather begin to slow down considerably.  For the past nearly 15 years he lived independently in an apartment, only needing outside help in the final months of his life.

Nicholas P. Santoro died on February 14, 2014 at home surrounded by family.




In 2007 I (granddaughter Alyce Santoro) conducted an interview with my grandfather, mostly concerning his lifelong relationship with bicycles:






From granddaughter Jennifer Pitts, daughter of Mary Santoro Pitts:

Grandpa was a wonderfully steadfast, reliable, and comforting presence in my life, especially from the time I moved from San Francisco to the East Coast for college, when he became my nearest family member and his house became a kind of home base for me. He was the one who dropped me off at college for the first time — we drove up the Merritt Parkway together, while he told me about his parents, his older sisters, and his early years in New York with my grandmother. A few years later, I lived with Grandpa in Tenafly for a few months when I worked for the New York City government. He’d see me off to the bus every morning, and we had dinner together most nights. He made terrific eggplant parmigiana, and he had an inexhaustible supply of stories along with an incredible memory for detail. It’s those stories and their details that I’ll always remember most fondly about him.

He especially admired his oldest sister, Lena, who in her teens was already the family’s main breadwinner. He liked to tell how she worked her way into a management position at Metropolitan Life by submitting winning ideas month after month to the company’s contest for employee suggestions until the downtown executives insisted on meeting the young woman from the Bronx office and gave her a promotion. Maybe it was her example that inspired him to study as hard as he did for the civil service exam that got him a position at the post office when he was about nineteen. He was proud that he had beat out what he called “college men” for what was a great, steady job during the Depression.

He had recently begun seeing my grandmother, whom he’d met at the candy factory and who lived at 124th Street in East Harlem. When he started working as a letter carrier on the Upper East Side, Grandpa would send her express-mail love letters. When he arrived at the station at 6 am, he’d use the pneumatic tubes that linked post offices up the East Side to get a letter to a friend who delivered mail in her neighborhood. That friend would hand her the letter as she walked to work.

Maybe his favorite moment working for the post office happened when a letter came in to the station late one night from President Roosevelt for Mrs. Roosevelt. He insisted on delivering it right away, despite the hour, and when he rang the bell, Mrs. Roosevelt in her bathrobe answered the door. He remembered the address — 65 East 65th Street — well into his nineties.

Grandpa was still playing the violin in those days when I was staying with him. And he knew every piece that came on the classical music station and would hum along as he cooked. Though he gave up playing the violin for good when he left Tenafly, he took his love of music in a new direction when he joined the Brookside Village choral group, led by Virginia Hakim, who has been such an important part of his life. 

My daughter Lucia, who is eight and learning the violin, enjoyed playing pieces for him over the phone and on visits to Brookside. Grandpa always had both praise and a few words of advice about what to work on. He liked to tell her the old joke he told us all as kids. A little boy carrying a violin case comes out of the subway and goes up to a man on the sidewalk. “Excuse me, mister,” he says, “Can you tell me how to get to Carnegie Hall?” “Practice, my boy, practice,” says the man. Lucia feels very lucky that she was able to get to know her great-grandfather, and during her last conversation with him about a week ago, she was eager to play him her newest pieces. She will really miss him. 

When my husband Sankar and I found out that our second child was a boy, I knew right away that I wanted to name him Nicholas after my grandfather. It meant a lot to me to be able to introduce the year-old Nicholas to his 99-year-old great-grandfather this past Thanksgiving and Christmas. I hope he’ll inherit something of Grandpa’s steadiness and his affectionate nature — he’d be lucky, too, to get his Grandpa’s iron constitution and his great memory.

From grandson John Pitts, son of Mary Santoro Pitts:

My grandfather was such an intelligent, intellectually curious guy – not only was he not slowed by a lack of formal education, he was probably spurred on as a result.  He was so interested in and well-informed about world events.  At lunch two years ago, when I asked him what it was like growing up in the Italian-American community in New York, he rapidly turned that into a discussion of Italy’s politics, the timeline of key events in World War II and the Mafia’s secret collaboration with the government to help the Allies conquer Sicily!

When I graduated from UCLA, three friends and I drove around the US for 2 ½ months.  We were lucky enough to stay for two nights at Grandpa’s place on Serpentine Road where he cheerfully put us all up and fed and entertained everyone.  In addition to appreciating his great hospitality, my friends were amazed by his engagement with the modern world, definitely not stuck in the past like “grandparents they were used to meeting”.  His nearly 100 years covered probably the most pronounced, rapid development in history yet he perpetually seemed most interested by new events unfolding  He also asked a lot of questions about my friends, their families and their future plans – 20 years later, they still recall our visit with Grandpa with fondness as a real highlight of our trip.

His knowledge of and interest in the world was all the more remarkable considering he never had the chance to travel himself (and given the one area in which he remained decidedly “old-school” – he never personally had much use for the internet).  I’ve been living in London for over 10 years and he was so interested to hear about places that I’d traveled to.  Hearing about destinations he had read about but never visited himself seemed to spark his imagination.  He was instrumental in helping my mother achieve her dream of attending NYU and studying in France.  And although it was not part of his own experience, he was always supportive of me living abroad for similar reasons, something which I’m really grateful for.


Wednesday, January 22, 2014

my great aunts, william hobart royce, & honoré de balzac


In my family, my maternal grandfather's sister Beatrice Larsen (on the left in the picture above) was referred to as Auntie Beatie. Her long-time best friend and partner in life was referred to as Dr. Abbie (on the right). Dr. Abbie was a general practitioner with an office on the ground floor of the Bay Ridge, Brooklyn brownstone they shared with Dr. Abbie's father, William Hobart Royce.

Beatie and Abbie both passed away when I was in my early teens, but I remember their loving and quirky spirits vividly. Family gatherings were often held at Twin Brooks, their 1950's-style ranch house and wooded property in the wilds of Katonah, NY. The small house was stuffed full of books and odd artifacts that fascinated me.

A week or so ago, while doing research on some philosophical concept or another, I came across the name Royce. Suddenly I remembered that Dr. Abbie's last name was Royce, and had a vague recollection that her father had been a Balzac scholar.

A quick internet search on "Balzac Royce" revealed the following.

From the Syracuse University Library:

William Hobart Royce (1878-1963) was an American author, bibliographer, book collector, and founder of the Balzac Society of America. 

Born on March 20, 1878, in Springfield, Massachusetts, Royce completed his formal education by graduating from the Springfield High School in 1897. Later he would write that his "only university has been the New York Public Library." 

After some bookstore experience in Springfield, Royce entered the booktrade in New York City, spending twelve years with the book department of the American News Company and seven years with the Lexington Book Shop. In 1917 he joined the Gabriel Wells rare book firm, for which he was manager for over 30 years. Wells and Royce shared a deep interest in Balzac (it was Wells who saved Balzac's house at Passy from destruction), and during this time the firm became the center of the sale of Balzaciana. Royce himself assembled a major collection of Balzac material, which was later donated to Syracuse University's Special Collections Research Center. 

Royce's published works ran to over a dozen titles. His books on Balzac include Balzac, Immortal (1926), A Balzac Bibliography (1929), Indexes to A Balzac Bibliography (1930), and Balzac as He Should Be Read (1946). Royce published over a half dozen volumes of his own verse; he wrote verse also under the pen name Willie Penmore. 

In 1940 Royce founded The Balzac Society of America. For over two decades he served as its president and edited its Bulletin. In recognition of his contributions to Balzac bibliography and collecting, Royce was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honor in 1935 and was made an honorary citizen of Issoudun, the French provincial town which is the setting of La Rabouilleuse

Royce was married in 1908 to Eda Maria Wallin. They had two daughters, Eva Allen Royce and Abbie Anna Royce, M.D. He died on January 28, 1963. 

Royce was the subject of a "Profile" article in The New Yorker, Apr 1, 1933, pp. 18-21. For further biographical and anecdotal material, see Life, Feb 24, 1947, pp. 19-20, 22; and "Brooklyn Balzac" by Stefan Zweig in Who, vol. 1, no. 3 (June 1941), p. 48.

I searched through a stack of old family photographs, recalling a badly-faded one of a man standing in front of a bookshop. I believe this to be Mr. Royce himself:

According to the article in The New Yorker, Mr. Royce became so engrossed in his research that he sought out the same Syrian Latakia pipe tobacco that Balzac smoked (which, Mr. Royce found, had "an unmistakable effect in clearing and invigorating the intellect"), attempted to reproduce the Frenchman's preferred blend of coffee (and consume it in the same inordinate proportions), and even took to wearing similar robes and experimenting with napping in the evening, then commencing work at midnight as Balzac had.

If Auntie Beatie and Dr. Abbie were still around today, there are so many questions I would love to  ask them! How had they met? What was it like for Dr. Abbie to be a woman doctor in New York City in the 1940's? Though Mr. Royce died years before I was born, I remember visiting the Brooklyn brownstone, and being impressed by the stacks of books covering every available surface, including all but the middle of every step on three flights of stairways...

Whatever became of all the books?

 
 
The only poem by William Hobart Royce that we've thus far been able to uncover, included in an anthology called Broken Land: Poems of Brooklyn by Julia Spicher Kasdorf:

It Happened on the Fourth Avenue Local, Brooklyn,
On My 77th Birthday, March 20, 1955


“Wake up!” the subway guard exclaimed
In no uncertain voice,
“For this is Seventy-seven’ Street,
And you are Mister Royce.”
“Thanks for your solicitude,”
I said, “but if I’m still alive,
I will remain upon the train
‘Til I reach Ninety-five.”





Wednesday, January 15, 2014

2006 Talk as Visiting Artist at the New School's Lang College


Alyce Santoro on The Art of Science, The Science of Art at The New School's Lang College, August 29, 2005 from alyce santoro on Vimeo.

Many of the themes contained in my new book were touched upon during this talk on "the art of science, the science of art" for incoming interdisciplinary students at Lang College.

Thursday, December 12, 2013

cheap art gift guide

If your holiday spirit is enhanced through encouragement and support of the creative spirit, we here at the Center for the Obvious & (Im)Permacultural research invite you to consider the following:

 
SONIC FABRIC TIES (handmade in New York City from my textile woven from recorded cassette tape) are on sale through the end of the year for $20 off.


ECSTATIC MECHANISM, Julian Mock's latest collection of stunningly beautiful, unconventional compositions for solo guitar. "There is an ecstatic mechanism in birds that makes them fly upwards in spite of worms."- Lawrence Ferlinghetti


 My latest project, just released: a limited-edition book on two decades of life and work at the intersection of art and science. Part catalog of my work, part manifesto on the ways that thinking shapes culture. PHILOSOPROPS: A UNIFIED FIELD GUIDE $40

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

yuletide traditions & the amanita muscaria mushroom




The evidence linking traditions commonly associated with Christmastime to the medicinal and ceremonial use of the Amanita muscaria mushroom by ancient (and modern) shamans is remarkable, yet little-known.


SANTA SUIT AS RITUAL GARMENT


Shamans of Siberia have for many centuries revered the Amanita muscaria mushroom (red with white spots) as a sacred and magical plant. The ceremonial garments of these shamans are traditionally red and white, resembling the typical Santa-style suit.


SANTA’S BAG AND STOCKINGS


The sacred mushrooms were gathered in sacks, and hung to dry on the hearth around the fireplace.


FLYING REINDEER WITH GLOWING NOSES, CHRISTMAS TREES, AND PRESENTS


Reindeer – the animal allies and spirit guides of the Siberian shamans - are fond of eating Amanita muscaria mushrooms, which grow almost exclusively beneath pine trees.


When the Amanita muscaria mushroom is ingested, it produces a dizzying feeling of floating or weightlessness. When taken at night, it is often accompanied by the sensation of being able to see in the dark. 



THE SANTAHEAD MUSHROOMS

I happened upon strings of Santa-head holiday lights at a discount store in Skowhegan, Maine back in 2004. I immediately acquired several strings, and set about creating these giant glowing mushrooms from papier-mache, using the Santa-heads in the caps:




Sunday, December 01, 2013

PHILOSOTOME!!




dear all, as 2013 winds to a close, i'm very pleased to announce that the project i have been excitedly immersed in for most of this year (and which has been in the back of my mind since at least 2001) has at last come to fruition:

http://alycesantoro.com/philosoprops_book.html

as many of you already know, the philosoprops are intended as catalysts for dialog, &/or to illustrate ideas. during my big solo show in nyc back in january, it became amply apparent that the tangible pieces are merely by-products of a process of thought, and that this process is more "the work" than the actual objects themselves. this book is not a catalog that happens to contain images of my work – this is my entire body of work in the form of a book. it takes the objects out of the studio, gallery, or museum and offers the-work-behind-the-work directly to anyone interested.

the 100-page book was beautifully offset printed in an edition of 250 on 100% recycled paper at engelhart printing in wimberley, texas, with over half the edition already spoken for by supporters who secured copies in advance. i'm currently in the process of hand wrapping and addressing over 140 packages – it's such a treat to see so many familiar names, as well as so many whom i have never met. thanks so, so much to each and everyone who helped to make this project possible!!

there are still about 80 print copies available – long excerpts, as well as digital versions, can be found on the philosoprops: a unified field guide dedicated page.

in other news, ecstatic mechanism, my partner julian mock's phenomenal album of unconventional works for solo guitar, was released this fall as well. 

early reports indicate that the book and music work together synergistically.

wishing you and yours a warm and peaceful december,
alyce
alycesantoro.com
@alyceobvious

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

thank you, backers!



 dear everyone,

i'm overwhelmed. thanks to all 169 of you, PHILOSOPROPS: A UNIFIED FIELD GUIDE is 277% funded. half of the edition of 250 books are already spoken for. and i'm able to employ the extra-special printing processes (offset and letterpress) that were only a pipedream at the outset.

the manuscript is in the final phases of editing and layout. i hope to have a link to the pdf version to send out to everyone who contributed within the coming weeks. if all goes smoothly, the books will be on their way to you in late october or early november.

to friends who know my work and have stuck with me through the years: thank you! when i set out to combine art and science, i knew it would take a long time to become a scientist first, then begin working on the art part. this book is the culmination of 24 years of independent research - it's a recap of where i've been, and where i hope this work is headed.

to those who hopped aboard this campaign without knowing me beforehand: thank you for taking a chance on me! if you're curious to know more about the stranger you've trusted with your generosity, please feel free to visit alycesantoro.com anytime, and have a look around. much of the information contained in this book exists there in one form or another.

please don't hesitate to contact me with any questions you may have...the tangible parts of this project are nowhere near as important as the connections it generates and the conversations it elicits.
PHILOSOPROPS:  A UNIFIED FIELD GUIDE has already exceeded my wildest expectations, and its barely begun.

thank you.

with heart,
alyce

Saturday, August 31, 2013

max cafard on philosoprops



It is a great honor and delight to have received this stellar endorsement of my upcoming artist's book PHILOSOPROPS: A UNIFIED FIELD GUIDE (acquirable via crowdfunding campaign until September 2) from the preeminent Surregionalist Writer, Pre-Ancientist Philosopher, and Zen Anarchist Max Cafard:

"Alyce Santoro is best known as the inventor of the most creative advance in textiles in the past few millennia. Her Sonic Fabric brought cloth and clothing into an entirely new sensory and indeed ontological realm. Dialectical materialism may have gone out of style in recent times, but Sonic Fabric has assured that dialectical material has a great future. Now, with Philosoprops, Santoro dedicates her impressive creative energies to the cause of making sure that dialectical philosophy, and, indeed, philosophy as a whole, also has an auspicious future. Her new book, Philosoprops is a kind of “Guide for the Unperplexed.” If you fear that you may be lapsing into some kind of dogmatic slumber, Philosoprops will shake you up a bit and render you more creatively perplexed. What is a philosoprop?  It’s a prop, something that helps you philosophize, and it’s also an op, an opportunity to have fun doing it. Santoro says that philosoprops are like philosophical toys. This is one of their most admirable qualities. They help bring play, and maybe even joyfulness, back into philosophy. It’s often been said that the origin of philosophy is in childlike wonder. But has this truth has been taken seriously, or seriously unseriously, enough? Santoro thinks not, and wants to do something about it. Philosoprops is a guide to engaged philosophizing, to doing, and not just thinking about doing. It helps return philosophy to everyday life. Philosoprops takes philosophy out of the hands of the philosopros and philosoprofs and puts it back in the hands of the philosopeeps.  Who knows what will happen when you get hooked on philosoprops? They may help you notice how you notice what you notice! If you do enough philosopropping, you may discover that in the end wisdom is just a mountain to be plucked, or a flower to be climbed, step by step! Whether or not you accept Santoro’s invitation to “choose determinism,”  I certainly hope that you will be determined to get this book!"

Saturday, August 10, 2013

PHILOSOPROPS: A UNIFIED FIELD GUIDE




dear friends,

i have just launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise funds to print copies of my new book PHILOSOPROPS: A UNFIED FIELD GUIDE.

If a scientist-turned-artist wrote an illustrated guide to philosophical implements used to investigate how thinking shapes culture, this would be it.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/819527322/philosoprops-a-unified-field-guide

the amount of funds i am able to raise will determine whether the book is digitally or offset printed in an edition of 100 or 250. if i can exceed the initial goal, the plan is to invest the additional resources into having the cover letterpress printed. the more i can raise, the more beautiful the book will be as a philosoprop in-and-of itself.

i am crowdsourcing not just the means to print the book, but generous friends are already in the process of helping to edit and proof-read the manuscript. i am also seeking thoughts on publicity, and recommendations on appropriate outlets for distribution (thanks so much to everyone who has already offered ideas!). i am attaching the press release below – please feel free to share it with anyone you feel may be interested!

and please don't hesitate to contact me with any thoughts or questions you may have!

thank you very much to everyone for your ongoing support.

Monday, June 10, 2013

JUNE STUDIO NEWS

"The Impossible Community" by John P. Clark


dear friends, for the past 4+ months solid, since the close of my "solo" * show and associated dialectic revivals at gasser-grunert gallery in nyc, i have been writing. and writing some more. i have something up my sleeve that i look forward to introducing soon...

meanwhile, i'd like to present the obvious international, a sub-work that has emerged from the larger, still-under-wraps project.

"the obvious international" is an imaginary collective - one joins by imagining oneself a part of it.
the manifesto was published this week in article form at truthout - the precepts are being crowdsourced - all are invited to contribute!

i'd also like to invite you to read my interview with social ecologist john p. clark at loyola university on his excellent new book "the impossible community: realizing communitarian anarchism". here's an excerpt:

"We need to stop demanding the impossible and simply do what is impossible. The strongest evidence for the possibility of something, including the impossible, is its actual existence. So, to begin with, we have to do some serious anarchaeology, uncovering the rich history of free community that lies under layers of domination and the ideology of domination." - John P. Clark

in an effort to support my writing habit, i have made available a brand new edition of OM (recorded with 136.1 Hz) ties in the sonic fabric shop, just in time for father's day! on sale now thru the end of june. OM edition yardage in black is also available - special discount for anyone on this list - please inquire.

all best,
alyce
alycesantoro.com
@alyceobvious

*autonomy is an illusion

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

existence precedes essence: the ashtray teacup philosoprop


Ashtray/Teacups, Glass teacups, ceramic paint, letterpress “EXISTENCE essence” tag, open edition begun circa 1995.



Back during my teenage obsession with the existentialists, in an effort to help me understand what Sartre meant by existence precedes essence, my father (a philosophy buff) used the example of a teacup that is used as an ashtray.  A person (or thing) is not necessarily what he or she (or it) purports to be - we are instead defined by our outward function and actions. If the teacup is used as an ashtray, can it really be considered a teacup, or does it take on a new existence as an ashtray?

The Ashtray/Teacup is perhaps my earliest philosoprop.






Tuesday, February 12, 2013

dialectic revival #3: wendy osserman's movement score for sonorous sails



Dialectic Revival #3, January 21, 2013: Site-specific movement score by Wendy Osserman performed by dance company members Lauren Ferguson, Emily Vetsch, Cori Kresge, and Wendy Osserman at Gasser-Grunert Gallery for Alyce Santoro's Sonorous Sails.

The Sonorous Sails (Tell-Tail Thangas After Sandy) are a set of 2 sailboat-sail-like shapes (21' x 10' and 17' x 5') made of Sonic Fabric, a textile woven from cassette tape. The sound collages contained in this edition of fabric include samples collected on and under the streets of New York City during the 5 years immediately following 9/11/2001. The "Between Stations" album is available for free download here: soundcloud.com/sonic-disobedience/sets/between_stations

 Tell-Tail Thangas (After Sandy) were created in December of 2012 especially for the cathedral-like lower gallery at Gasser-Grunert, which was entirely submerged during Hurricane Sandy. The sails, pointing to the heavens, are symbols of resurrection, resilience, reverence, and cooperation with nature.

Friday, February 08, 2013

tell-tail thangkas (after sandy) at gasser-grunert



My solo exhibition Philosoprops & Ontological Apparatus from the Center for the Obvious & (Im)Permacultural Research opened at Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert Gallery, 524 W19th St, NYC on January 10, and will remain on view until February 16, 2013.

Tell-Tail Thangas (After Sandy) are a set of 2 sailboat sails (21' x 10' and 17' x 5') made of sonic fabric, a textile woven from cassette tape. The recordings contained in this edition of fabric include sound-samples collected on and under the streets of New York City during the 5 years immediately following 9/11/2001. The "Between Stations" album is available for free download. Tell-Tail Thangas (After Sandy) were created in December of 2012 especially for the cathedral-like lower gallery at Gasser-Grunert, which was entirely submerged during Hurricane Sandy. The sails, pointing to the heavens, are symbols of resurrection, resilience, reverence, and cooperation with nature.


Monday, January 07, 2013

dialectic revival series

WELCOME to the DIALECTIC REVIVAL


This month, as part of the Philosoprops & Onotological Apparatus exhibition in NYC at the gallery of Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert, we will be hosting a series of focused discussions in the spirit of a Dialectic Revival.

The primary goal of the dialectic method is to pool knowledge and compare and contrast differing viewpoints on a matter for the purpose of deepening overall understanding. Unlike forms of debate in which one side attempts to demonstrate the superiority of a singular view over an opposing one by any means available (including emotional persuasion not based in reason), those willing to engage in a new dialectic favor logic, analytical proof, and rational deduction. Those who participate in dialectic discourse recognize that all conditions are in a continuous state of flux, and therefore definitive resolution may not be possible.

We hope you can join us at 523 W 19th St. for the following discussions:

SATURDAY JAN 19

5pm: "Green Hermeticism and Eco Art"
A discussion on art, science, alchemy, and associated apparatus with Eve Andree Laramee, Linda Weintraub, and Dehlia Hannah

SUNDAY JAN 20

3pm: "In Search Of..."
Killing the Buddha editors Brook Wilensky-Lanford, Nathan Schneider, and Meera Subramanian will invite dialog on quests for the divine, using their own experiences as jumping-off points: searches for the Eden of the past, proof for the existence of God, and an Eden of the future, respectively. Click here for Facebook invite.

MONDAY JAN 21

6:30pm "Site-Specific Movement Score in Room Submerged During Sandy" Wendy Osserman with dance company members Lauren Ferguson, Emily Vetsch, and Cori Kresge will cite the specific.

7pm: "Trigger Points After the Storm"
In a post-Sandy environment can we layer bioregionalism, environmental justice and intuition for coastal resilience? We will explore how aesthetic tools can trigger healing. Hosted by Aviva Rahmani, with Wendy Osserman.

TUESDAY JAN 22

7pm  "Philosoprops & Ontological Apparatus"
Implements as catalysts for discourse with Nathaniel Katz proprietor of the Pacifist Library, Chris Robbins of Ghana Think Tank, and "Really Literally Literary", a special spontaneous action with Nina Katchadourian and Elizabeth Demaray




Wednesday, December 19, 2012

philosoprops & ontological apparatus at gasser-grunert gallery

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Philosoprops & Ontological Apparatus
from the Center for the Obvious
& (Im)Permacultural Research
by Alyce Santoro,
Delicate Empiricist

All Are Invited to Join the Center for the Obvious & (Im)Permacultural Research, a Semi-Ephemeral Anti-Institution Dedicated to Reverence of Phenomena and Non-Phenomena. Associated Artifacts & Happenings at Gasser-Grunert, 524 W 19th St., New York, NY from January 10th through February 16th, 2013.

On January 10 from 6pm – 8pm Please Gather With Klemens Gasser, Tanja Grunert, and Alyce Santoro (Delicate Empiricist) for the Hoisting of a Sonorous Sail, Woven from Cassette Tape Recorded with Samples Collected On and Under the Streets of New York City.  

ALSO OFFERED:


The Homeopathic Remedies for the 5 Ills of Society – based on the premise that like cures like, tinctures to counter VIOLENCE, DETACHMENT, CONSUMERISM, ALIENATION, and GREED were made from dilute solutions of bullet, glue, water from Wal-Mart, emptiness, and money, respectively.

The Upside-down LIFE – silkscreened on newsprint, this enlarged version of the LIFE magazine logo is intended as street art, to be applied upside-down. In a topsy-turvy world, making things right begins with a mental shift.

Goethe’s Game – delicate pieces exist within a closed system, each entity acting on others regardless of physical proximity. Based on 1970’s toy “Booby Trap” and quotes by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, "If you would seek comfort in the whole, you must learn to discover the whole in the smallest part," and Buckminster Fuller, “The entire universe is in tension.”


Assorted wearable apparatus, including a Satellite Dish Hat, a Copper Listening Pillow, and Sonorous Superhero Suits made of fabric woven from cassette tape.


CHOOSE DETERMINISM – Research-in-progress into a “grand unification theory” for philosophy: can free will and determinism operate simultaneously, as do the paradoxical laws of classical and quantum physics?

Dialectic Revival ­­– Ongoing collaborative inquiry and improvisation. TBA.
ABOUT THE CFTO/IPR:

The CFTO/IPR encourages exploration into Joseph Beuys’ postulate, “Before considering the question WHAT CAN WE DO we have to look into the question HOW MUST WE THINK?”

Our inquiries lead to the generation and collection of philosoprops, catalysts for open-ended discussion around a range of social, scientific, and philosophical concepts. In order to effectively communicate about these themes we are working to revive dialectic, an earnest form of information-pooling that acknowledges and embraces paradox, nuance, flux, and interrelationship.

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe referred to research based on intuition and empathy derived from prolonged observation as “delicate empiricism”. With a background in science and scientific illustration, CFTO/IPR agent Alyce Santoro uses a delicate empiricist approach to the development of conceptual movements and multimedia catalysts for dialog and social engagement that challenge notions of separateness between seemingly disparate entities.

Santoro is the inventor of Sonic Fabric, an audible textile woven from recorded audiocassette tape, and has initiated several experimental social action campaigns including the Synergetic Omni-Solution, the Dialectic Revival, OCCUPY EVERYWHERE, the USE HALF NOW Campaign, and Collective Democracy. She is a frequent contributor to Truthout.org, where she writes about the social construction of human relationship with the biosphere. She moved from the Brooklyn neighborhood of Red Hook seven years ago to experiment with appropriate technologies (including permaculture, rainwater harvesting, small-scale solar, etc.) in the Big Bend region of far west Texas, 90 miles from the Mexican border.

For more information please contact:
website: http://www.gassergrunert.net
email: tanja@gassergrunert.net
phone: 646-944-6197